About CICERO

Climate change is one of the greatest threats facing us today. CICERO’s mission is to provide reliable and comprehensive knowledge about all aspects of the climate change problem.

 

Amerikanske senatorer på Svalbard

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton visited Norway in 2012. In this photo: Former CICERO Director Cecilie Mauritzen, Hillary Clinton, Director Helge Lund, Statoil, Lead Country Manager Meg O'Neill, ExxonMobil Norway and Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Støre (Photo: Ministry of Foreign Affairs)

Emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases are contributing to climate change. Research shows that the average temperature can increase between 1.1 and 6.4 ºC over the next hundred years if we do not reduce our emissions. One consequence of this warming is that the weather is likely to become more extreme.

The consequences could be serious: hurricanes, heat waves, floods, avalanches, drought, heavier snowfall, and sea level rise can cost lives and damage ecosystems, human health, man-made assets and production systems – threatening human welfare and security.

As a major exporter of fossil fuels, Norway bears a special responsibility in the international cooperation on climate and the environment.

Who are we?

The Norwegian government established CICERO (the Center for International Climate and Environmental Research – Oslo) by royal decree in 1990. CICERO is an independent research center associated with the University of Oslo.

CICERO conducts research on and provides information and expert advice about national and international issues related to climate change and climate policy.

CICERO's mission

CICERO’s mission is to conduct research and provide reports, information and expert advice about issues related to global climate change and international climate policy with the aim of acquiring knowledge that can help mitigate the climate problem and enhance international climate cooperation.

Research

The climate issue is extensive. We need to learn more about how to curb man-made climate change and adapt to the impacts. In order to effectively reduce man-made climate change we need to understand how climate policies can be made deeper with respect to emissions cuts, broader with respect to participation, and longer with a view to the future?

Cooperation must take place across scientific disciplines and national borders. CICERO conducts interdisciplinary research on a wide range of relevant questions.

Information

The climate problem is complex. CICERO has a national mandate to make information about climate research and climate policy accessible to various target groups: students, teachers, politicians, government, industry and business, media and the general public. Our most important information channels are our website and our popular-scientific climate magazine Klima. The magazine is published six times a year and is distributed free of charge to subscribers.

CICERO also offers free subscriptions to Klimanytt – a press clip service that sends an overview of national and international climate news to subscribers by e-mail. And our Climate Forum creates a meeting place where researchers and representatives from government and business and industry can exchange information and viewpoints.

The mass media is a prioritized target group. CICERO’s researchers participate actively in the climate debate through feature articles, opinion pieces, interviews, and expert commentary.

Cooperation

CICERO participates in a broad network of research communities both nationally and internationally. Several of our researchers also hold positions at the University of Oslo, and CICERO houses several PhD students.

CICERO is located in the Oslo Centre for Interdisciplinary Environmental and Social Research (CIENS). We cooperate actively with many of the other CIENS institutes. We also work closely with other Norwegian research institutes in the fields of political science and economics.

CICERO cooperates with a number of research communities throughout Europe and North America. We have also established an active network in several developing countries, including China and India.

CICERO participates actively in the assessment work of the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change). We are also represented in several boards of directors and commissions, as well as in international and national committees. CICERO contributes regularly to governmental reports and hearings.

Who uses CICERO’s services?

CICERO is primarily a research institute and carries out projects funded by, for example, the Research Council of Norway and the EU Framework Programs. CICERO also undertakes consultancy work, in both its research and its information capacity, for government ministries and agencies, business, and national and international organizations such as the World Bank.

Our staff

CICERO has a staff of nearly 80 in total. The researchers at CICERO represents a wide range of disciplines including anthropology, atmospheric chemistry, meteorology, geophysics, human geography, sociology, biology, chemistry, political science, and economics. About two-thirds of our research staff hold a doctorate, and half are women. CICERO has a small administrative staff, and a separate information department.

Last updated: 16.05.11

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Eco-Lighthouse

Miljøfyrtårn
CICERO is certified as Eco-Lighthouse.

CICERO
CICERO, P.O. Box. 1129 Blindern,
N-0318 Oslo, NORWAY
Visiting adress: Gaustadalléen 21, 0349 OSLO
Editor:
Christian Bjørnæs
Web editor:
Eilif Ursin Reed
Phone:
+47 22 85 87 50
E-mail:
post@cicero.oslo.no>